Go RVing in Logan County

Hop in your RV, hitch up your camper or pack your pup tent. If you want to get away, we've got all the "away" you will need. Logan County is the perfect Colorado vacation idea for getting out into the great outdoors with room to roam.

north sterling state park campsite 2

Road Trip Colorado Vacation Ideas

Experience the wide open, the big sky, the quiet roadways, the slower way of life, all on your own. Close around Sterling are options for travelers who prefer recreational vehicles and tent camping. You will feel right at "home" at our campsite facilities. This is your invitation to get away to escape and explore as you see fit.

camping at north sterling state park 2

RV Parks & Camping

1. Buffalo Hills Campground & RV Park. Located on the east side of Sterling, you can set up and still be able to easily hop into town for activities or to enjoy the local atmosphere. Full hookups, pull through sites and tent sites. 

2. North Sterling Reservoir State Park. Star gazing, bird watching, wildlife viewing, hiking, fishing, boating, and 141 camping sites all year long. A marina on site offers camping essentials, plus boat and water sport rentals.

sterling rv

3. Sterling RV Park. This is a perfect stopping point between the Midwest and Rocky Mountain National Park. Put your feet up and enjoy the quiet countryside from your home away from home.

4. Wagon Wheel Mobile Home & RV Park. No pull through sites, but 4 full-hookup sites for your extended stay convenience.

 

More dispersed camping opportunities are available at Prewitt State Wildlife Area and Jumbo State Wildlife Area. Overnight parking (no hookups) is also available at the Logan County Visitor Center, I-76 and Exit 125.

Top 3 Places for a Photo Op in Logan County

cactus bloom 2020

Tucked in the northeast corner of Colorado is Logan County, offering a unique prairie experience for wildlife viewing and photo opportunities.

The open prairie may look unremarkable at first glance, but visitors who take the time to look a little closer at the wildlife, plants, and geology of the area will find a hardy ecosystem just as unique and fascinating as any mountain forest. Keep a look out for dove, quail, ring-necked pheasant, rabbit, raccoon, bobcat, coyote, deer, and pronghorn.

jacqueline.mitchek.sterling.antelope 3

Top 3 Places for a Photo Op in Logan County

1.  North Sterling State Park: Broad, golden grasslands stretch out in all directions from the park’s reservoir, bordered by majestic bluffs to the north, farm and ranchlands to the east, and clear blue skies above.

2.  Overland Trail Recreation Area: Positioned along the South Platte River, this area features a fishing pond and natural walking paths that are often occupied by deer, Canada geese, beavers, wildflowers and blooming cactus.

3.  Tamarack Ranch State Wildlife Area: While you won’t see many tamarack trees here, this large state wildlife area is the best spot in northeastern Colorado to search for the full suite of northeastern birding specialties. Read more about birding on the Tamarack Ranch.

More ideas for getting outdoors. Don't forget your camera!

Logan County Courthouse Art Gallery

Enjoy this series of virtual field trips, highlighting some of the gems of Sterling and Logan County. We are looking forward to your next visit!

the american indian

“The American Indian”

This painting depicts the Indian Societies of North America. No particular tribe is hereby intended, but this is a tribute to all those who inhabited these lands before the white man invasion. The Indian believed that he was a part of nature, just as were the earth, sky, rock, air, and water; and he believed they were all brothers. This painting has many contrasting forces, such as the soft blends of the sky and background in comparison to the sharper lines of the subject. For no matter how much the Indian believed in nature, he had a difficult struggle to exist in it.

By Artist Eugene Carara

Inside the historic Logan County Courthouse in downtown Sterling is the Eugene Carara art collection. These oil paintings were purchased by private citizens and then donated to Logan County to keep the collection together. The paintings are symbolic of historically important events or locations to the people of northeastern Colorado.

The American Indian

The American Indian has been idealized as almost supernaturally attuned to Mother Nature. And the Indian did understand her capricious powers far better than subsequent peoples who have managed to isolate themselves somewhat from those powers.

The Cheyenne and Arapaho came to the eastern plains of Colorado during the 1820s to acquire horses and free themselves from the drudgery of farming. Their nomadic life was near ideal at first. They reveled in Colorado’s sparkling clear air, the wild horses, millions of buffalo, and abundance of other life on the prairie, and most of all in the knowledge that they could break camp within minutes and move to a more desirable place whenever they wished.

Yet the very nature which the Indian worshipped could send blinding blizzards that froze him and his horses. Hail stones which she threw at the earth shredded his buffalo skin lodges.

Northeastern Colorado was home to the Cheyenne and Arapahoe for about fifty years. Indian friends, especially the Sioux, often came from north of the Platte to visit and hunt. But the Pawnees also came. The most fearsome of red men, they came not in friendship but to satisfy their hunger for a good fight.

And eventually, the white men crossed the prairie, and the Indians’ days on the “Great Buffalo Pasture” were numbered.

 By Logan County historian, Nell Brown Propst

 

Logan County Courthouse Art Gallery

Enjoy this series of virtual field trips, highlighting some of the gems of Sterling and Logan County. We are looking forward to your next visit when it is safe once again to get out and travel!

sterling queen city of the high plains

“Sterling – Queen City of the High Plains”

This painting represents not only the City of Sterling today, but reveals some hidden history in its development. The vastness of the high plains and the surprising height of some summer cloud formation gently cradles the city lights. Soon daylight will end and the cool evening breezes will usher in another quiet night on the plains.

By Artist Eugene Carara

Inside the historic Logan County Courthouse in downtown Sterling is the Eugene Carara art collection. These oil paintings were purchased by private citizens and then donated to Logan County to keep the collection together. The paintings are symbolic of historically important events or locations to the people of northeastern Colorado.

Sterling – Queen City of the High Plains 1873-1984

Sterling was remarkable from the beginning. Settled primarily by Southerners escaping the grim aftermath of the Civil War, it looked like a Southern town with its courthouse square and trees planted by the homesick newcomers.

The people were enterprising. When Greeley shunned them as “rebels,” they came down river to carve their own civilization from what Nathan Meeker, founder of Greeley, called “the finest body of wild land to be found anywhere in the world.”

They were practical. After several years, they moved their town three miles, close to where the railroad would run.

They were hardworking. Men, women, and children broke the sod and planted crops. Sometimes, a woman worked the farm while her husband walked miles to a budding town business.

They appreciated spiritual and aesthetic values. Churches sprang up all over town, at first in sod huts. Musicales and plays were produced in the “opera house” atop the courthouse. They painted, wrote, discussed.

Next came Midwesterners and then one ethnic group after another. Each put his customs and distinctive foods in the pot. Each brought people of special interests. The first generations may have dug their way through countless fields. The second dug and studied as well and often attended college.

 By Logan County historian, Nell Brown Propst

Stay Creative Sterling

Art in the Square Out of the Box

chalk art girl with wings

Through the end of May, the Logan County Arts League (LOCAL) is hosting a virtual sidewalk chalk contest, called Art in the Square Out of the Box.

Anyone is invited to creatively chalk their driveway or sidewalk or patio (make sure you add #LOCAL to the design) and submit a photo to LOCAL - Logan County Arts League Facebook page by May 29 to win gift cards to Sterling restaurants participating in carry-out service. Winners will be announced May 31.

chalk art flowers

To create your masterpiece, free sidewalk chalk may be picked up from the Logan County Chamber of Commerce, 109 N. Front St., in Sterling, weekdays, 9 am – 4 pm.

(LOCAL embraces human creativity and imagination in all things, whether it is in music, painting, theater, dance, food, literature, or others.)

Logan County Courthouse Art Gallery

Enjoy this series of virtual field trips, highlighting some of the gems of Sterling and Logan County. We are looking forward to your next visit when it is safe once again to get out and travel!

fort wicked

“Fort Wicked”

This painting depicts the gallant stand against the Cheyenne war parties by Holon Godfrey, his family, and friends. Holon, a brave and adventurous man, believed he could hold out against all odds except fire. I deliberately painted this in a primitive style in order to reveal many objects. It is also a very busy painting in order to help convey excitement and panic. I tried to show worry and anger in the face of Holon, weariness in the face of Matilda, and feat in the face of Cecilia (the girl in the window). By the way, after three days of battle, the Cheyenne finally ceased their attack.

By Artist Eugene Carara

 

Inside the historic Logan County Courthouse in downtown Sterling is the Eugene Carara art collection. These oil paintings were purchased by private citizens and then donated to Logan County to keep the collection together. The paintings are symbolic of historically important events or locations to the people of northeastern Colorado.

 

Fort Wicked – Southwest of present day Merino – January 14, 1865

Just before dawn on a January morning, Holon Godfrey saw something coming fast out of the hills to the southeast. It was what he feared—Indians—at least 130 of them. Bloody January had come to his trading post. And he had only three men to help him defend it.

So began a three-day siege that would earn Godfrey the Indians’ respect and their nickname of “Old Wicked” and that would make his ranch the most famous along the South Platte River. Holon had turned his place into a fortress, but he had another asset: his wife and children. They molded bullets, drew water from the well, and formed a brigade to Holon who, with a bucket in one hand and a fun in the other, put out the fires set by the red men. The girls stuck hats on brooms and hoe handles and poked “heads” here and there over the top of the wall to food the Indians into thinking there were more defenders.

“By God, they got us outnumbered, but we’ll lick ‘em with our brains,” Holon cackled.

He was right. Fort Wicked, as the ranch was always known after the siege, was one of only two places along six hundred miles of the trail that escaped Blood January unscathed.

By Logan County historian, Nell Brown Propst

Logan County Courthouse Art Gallery

Enjoy this series of virtual field trips, highlighting some of the gems of Sterling and Logan County. We are looking forward to your next visit when it is once again safe to get out and travel!

battle of summit springs

“The Battle of Summit Springs”

This painting depicts how one can sacrifice his life to save others. During a storm-threatened afternoon, this young lad stampeded this herd of horses into Chief Tall Bull’s camp in order to warn them of the attacking Pawnee scouts. The young boy was killed, along with many other Cheyenne that day, but because of his heroics, many survived. It is difficult to imagine what went through his mind before making his decision to stampede the herd, but one thing is clear, it was a split-second decision from one so young. Life is so precious, especially young life.

Artist Eugene Carara

 

Inside the historic Logan County Courthouse in downtown Sterling is the Eugene Carara art collection. These oil paintings were purchased by private citizens and then donated to Logan County to keep the collection together. The paintings are symbolic of historically important events or locations to the people of northeastern Colorado.

 

The Battle of Summit Springs - July 11, 1869

On a hot July afternoon in 1869, life on the Colorado plains came to an end for the Indians. Tall Bull, chief of the Dog Soldiers, protectors of the Cheyenne tribe, led several bands of his people, plus Arapahoe and Sioux friends, to camp at Summit Springs. He did not dream that General E.A. Carr and his 5th Calvary were close behind.

General Carr was no Chivington. Afterwards, he wrote, “We have...no pleasure in killing.” But Tall Bull had given him no choice. A few weeks earlier, his force had attacked several communities in western Kansas, killing people and taking captive Susanna Alderdice and Maria Weichel, both pregnant. They had killed three of Susanna’s children and left another for dead. Before July 11 would end, Susanna would also die.

The army was assisted by the Cheyennes’ old enemy, the Pawnees, who thundered across the prairie after women and children, killing many. Others escaped only because the Pawnees took time to scalp and mutilate every victim.

Sand Creek and Summit Springs bore dramatic similarities and contracts. At Sand Creek, an old man folded his arms and bravely awaited death. At Summit Springs, a young boy gave his life to try to save his people. Neither death succeeded except as a source of pride for the Cheyennes.

Sand Creek had launched the war on the South Platte. Summit Sprints brought the end of the Indian life on the Colorado prairie.

Logan County historian Nell Brown Propst

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